The faces of Trident Juncture

50,000 troops from 31 nations participate in exercise Trident Juncture. Meet some of them.

Berit Bögelsack,

Staff Sergeant, German Military Police 

This summer, Berit, 23, and her sister went on a hiking trip in the Norwegian mountains. Now she is back in Norway as a NATO soldier, participating in exercise Trident Juncture.

"When I became a soldier I discovered the joy of outdoor life."

Bögelsack is from Hannover in Germany, and has been in the German Armed Forces, Bundeswehr, since 2012. This summer, Berit and her sister packed their backpacks and travelled to Bergen and Aurlandsdalen.

"We enjoyed travelling by ferries and seeing the Norwegian fjords."

Bögelsack is Staff Sergeant in the military police and is deployed to Rena Base during the beginning of the exercise. One of her tasks is to ensure that the vehicles of the German Armed Forces will arrive safely and according to Norwegian road regulations.

It will be interesting to learn more about driving skills on icy, slippery roads.

She joined the army because of the opportunities to travel, be physically active and experience military companionship.

"This job has a range of possibilities that a civilian job doesn't have. Besides, I like exercising, using my body and being outdoors."

 Further reading here

 

 

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Bögelsack is looking forward to train in Norwegian winter conditions.

"I'm eager to learn how extreme temperatures affect the body. It will also be interesting to learn more about driving skills on icy, slippery roads."

Philipp Ständer 

Captain, German Military Police

"Being an officer is exciting because I never know how the day will turn out", says Philipp Ständer. 

He is Captain in the German Armed Forces Military Police. 

Back home in Münster in Germany, he is a platoon leader and deputy commander, responsible for about 130 troops. 

"Being an officer is exciting because I never know how the day will turn out", says Ständer.

He has his education from the German Armed Forces, and has travelled to Brussels and Beijing, and studied political science for six months in Canada.

During the exercise he will be part of putting together a multinational military police unit consisting of Norwegian, German, Belgian and Dutch troops.

I enjoy learning about other countries' military police and how they work.

He has been to Norway once before, on a short trip to Mo i Rana in northern Norway.

"It was during the winter, and very windy with lots of snow and icy roads. It was interesting to experience tough winter conditions", says Ständer who says that the German soldiers are well equipped with winter warfare equipment for the exercise.

What impression do you have of the Norwegian soldier?

"The ones I've met so far are young, sporty and speak English fluently. It is fun to work together, because we communicate well."

The German soldiers live in large tents during the exercise, which the officer think is okay.

"The sanitation facilities are very good. It may sound a little stupid, but it's important to have good sanitary conditions when you're in the field for a longer period of time."

Kristof Jessulat

1st Lieutenant, German Logistics Officer 

Kristof Jessulat, 27, joined the German Armed Forces because he wanted to work with people and learn to become a good military leader. 

"Besides, I wanted to do something for my country", he says.

During the exercise, Jessulat is leader of a transport platoon. His job is to coordinate supplies and transportation.

"My platoon will make sure that the fighting troops have what they need when it comes to food, clothing, equipment and fuel."

"Now I'm excited to see if the preparations we have made during the recent months are good enough."

I especially like the fresh air and the mountains. And I'm looking forward to tasting Norwegian fish.

Trident Juncture is his first major exercise, which provides great opportunities in terms of learning.

So far he has prepared his platoon for the Norwegian winter conditions by practicing driving on slippery roads and mounting driving chains on the vehicles.

"We have also tested whether our fuel will work in Norwegian winter temperatures. Jessulat has not been in Norway before."

"I especially like the fresh air and the mountains. And I'm looking forward to tasting Norwegian fish."

Published 24 October 2018 19:33..