Herman, McDonald & Mastny:Did intelligence matter in the Cold War?

FS 1/2006
Did intelligence help to avoid the Cold War becoming “hot”? We have invited three prominent intelligence scholars to give their views.
​​Forsvarsstudier no. 1/2006
Title: Did intelligence matter in the Cold War?
Authors: Michael Herman, J. Kenneth McDonald & Vojtech Mastny
Pages: 69


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For forty years the superpower conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union dominated the world stage. In popular culture the conflict produced a plethora of “spy” books and films about the daring exploits of intelligence agents. In contrast, the scholarly investigation of the role of intelligence in the Cold War had to await the gradual opening, since 1990, of “Top Secret” archives. It is now time to make a first attempt at assessing the role that intelligence played in the overall development of the conflict. Did intelligence help to avoid the Cold War becoming “hot”? We have invited three prominent intelligence scholars to give their views.

Michael Herman, Senior Analyst at Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters (1952–87), with secondments to the Cabinet Office and the Ministry of Defence. Author of Intelligence Services in the Information Age (2001) and Intelligence Power in Peace and War (1996).

J. Kenneth McDonald, Chief Historian of the Central Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C. (1981–95), Professor of History and International Affairs at George Washington University (1961–81). Most recent publication: US Intelligence Community Reform Studies since 1947 (2005).


Vojtech Mastny, Senior Fellow at tbe National Security Archive in Washington, where he directs the Parallel History Project on NATO and the Warsaw Pact (PHP). Author of A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact (2005, with Malcolm Byrne) and The Cold War and Soviet Insecurity (1996).

Publisert 1. januar 2006 09:08.. Sist oppdatert 3. august 2017 16:03.