C-130J Hercules flyet "Frigg 5601" fra 335 skavdronen på Jan Mayen / C-130J Hercules from 335 squadron at Jan Mayen (Named Frigg with tale number 5601)C-130J Hercules flyet "Frigg 5601" fra 335 skavdronen på Jan Mayen / C-130J Hercules from 335 squadron at Jan Mayen (Named Frigg with tale number 5601)http://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/tkR8538eng.jpghttp://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=2018
Et F-16 fra 338 skvadronen på Ørland hovedflystasjon under treningstur / A F-16 fighter planes from 338 squadron during a traing sortie at Ørland main air stationEt F-16 fra 338 skvadronen på Ørland hovedflystasjon under treningstur / A F-16 fighter planes from 338 squadron during a traing sortie at Ørland main air stationhttp://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/tk338skvR8835eng.jpghttp://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=2020
NH 90 i Bardufoss / NH90 in BardufossNH 90 i Bardufoss / NH90 in Bardufosshttp://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/_MG_5399eng.jpghttp://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=2019

The Air Force

With new fighter jets and new helicopters in the coming years, the Norwegian Air Force faces major changes in its organisation and structure.

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The Royal Norwegian Air Force provides units and personnel for operations both in peacetime, crisis and war – in Norway and abroad.

The Air Force also ensures that forces are at constant readiness for aerial surveillance, the exercise of authority and the upholding of national sovereignty. The Air Force also operates Norway's search and rescue helicopters.

The Chief of the Air Force, supported by the Air Staff, is responsible for force production and is bas​ed at Rygge, Southeastern Norway. The current Chief is Major General Tonje Skinnarland.

Norway has chosen the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter as its new combat aircraft, and the first F-35s will land in Norway late 2017. The new fleet of combat aircraft will define and shape the whole Air Force structure in the years to come. The decision to procure the F-35 is the most important driver in the structuring of Norway's future air defence, especially​ when it comes to the necessary changes in base and support structure to be implemented in the coming years.

Operational capabilities

  • 57 F-16 combat aircraft
  • 12 Sea King helicopters for search and rescue (SAR)
  • ​2 P-3N and 4 P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft
  • 4 C-130 J Hercules tactical transport aircraft
  • NH90 helicopters for maritime operations (currently being phased in)
  • 18 Bell 412 SP tactical transport helicopters
  • 3 DA-20 Jet Falcon for electronic operations and VIP transport
  • 16 Saab Safari training aircraft
  • 1 NASAMS II air defence unit
  • 1 base set with ordnance disposal, rescue units, NBC, medical, guard and security units, dog unit and communications
  • 2 monitoring and warning stations for airspace surveillance and command and control

Force​​ pr​​oducing units​

  • Ørland Air Station (the main hub for Norway's F-35)
  • Other air stations: Andøya, Bardufoss, Gardermoen, and Rygge. 
  • Air Force Base Bodø
  • Station Group Sola and Banak
  • The search and rescue service operates from Banak, Bodø, Rygge, Sola, Ørland and the civil airport at Florø
  • Air Defence Control and Reporting Centre (CRC): Sørreisa, Northern Norway. Also has an education and training centre
  • Air Force Operations Inspectorate, Rygge
  • Air Force Training Inspectorate, Rygge
  • Air Force Academy, Trondheim
  • Air Force Flying School, Bardufoss
  • Air Force Education Centre (Officer Candidate School and Technical School), Kjevik
  • Basic Training Establishment KNM Harald Haarfagre, Madla, Stavanger
Published 11 June 2015 17:35.. Last updated 30 January 2017 11:29.